SOSEScript: CIVweatherright.php5 failed executing with the following error: Error on line 16 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$location Error on line 16 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 17 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 17 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 18 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 18 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 19 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 19 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 20 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 20 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 21 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 21 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 22 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 22 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object Error on line 23 position 1: Undefined property: stdClass::$current_observation Error on line 23 position 1: Trying to get property of non-object

Last updated: July 31. 2013 2:15PM - 997 Views

Photo courtesy | N.C. Wildlife CommissionAlligators are dangerous animals and only authorized wildlife officers should be near them.
Photo courtesy | N.C. Wildlife CommissionAlligators are dangerous animals and only authorized wildlife officers should be near them.
Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

Following recent reports of people seeking interaction with alligators, the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission is reminding residents and visitors that feeding or harassing alligators is both illegal and dangerous.


Alligators are native to North Carolina. They are common along the coast and in the coastal plain region.


“In most instances if you see an alligator, it is not necessary to do anything other than leave it alone,” said Wildlife Officer Daniel Kennedy, stationed in Pamlico County. “The Wildlife Commission typically does not trap and relocate alligators unless it presents a real threat — not a perceived threat — to people and animals, or is in imminent danger itself.”


Feeding an alligator will cause the animal to lose its fear of people, making it more likely to approach and possibly attack someone. Kennedy currently is investigating a case of an alligator being fed, which he warned could result in charges. But the more serious threat is the potential for injuries, he said.


Only authorized wildlife biologists and wildlife officers can remove problem alligators.


Alligators are listed as threatened by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Alligator hunting is prohibited by state law, as is the killing of an alligator.


To report wildlife harassment or other violations, call 1-800-662-7137. For information on wildlife conservation in North Carolina, visit www.ncwildlife.org.



Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute